Botanical Garden is now blooming


By D. C. Moody - dmoody@civitasmedia.com



There are plenty of bridges and water holes for the perfect photo op or a moment of contemplation in the quiet solitude.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

“Cracker crumbs” hosta is now in bloom, just one of the many varieties of hosta which may be found within the SC Botanical Garden.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Waterfalls are seemingly everywhere, providing soothing background music to a leisurely stroll.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

One good thing about a visit to the SC Botanical Garden is the opportunity to not be in a hurry. With plenty of vistas and seating, visitors may take their time and enjoy all the garden’s sights and sounds.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Japanese Camellias are some of the early bloomers and provide a variety of colors for the appreciative onlooker.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Structures such as this well house provide unexpected discoveries during a weekend walking adventure.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

The sunshine was pouring down and even this common watersnake was quick to enjoy a little sunbathing while others enjoyed the garden itself.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

There are birds, and bird watching stations for the enthusiast, all throughout the garden and it is a rare day when they cannot be seen or heard throughout. Here a crow stops in for a drink of cool water before moving on.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

These waterfalls are part of the Hunt House exhibit, a cabin which has been restored to its original condition circa 1826.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Statuary is strategically placed throughout the garden as a highlight to the natural flora. This piece is entitled “Taming the Wild Wunkus” and is placed prominently within the butterfly garden.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Geese, ducks, and turtles were not to be left out as they surfaced and landed on man made islands within one of the garden’s ponds to enjoy a beautiful day.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

PICKENS COUNTY — In what appears to have been the blink of an eye Spring has sprung and the world around us is ready to burst into bloom with beauty and warmer days ahead.

If you enjoy being outside, especially as the seasons begin to change and spring is preparing to unleash its bounty upon us, now is the time to begin your visits to the SC Botanical Garden located at Clemson University.

The Botanical Garden is one of the hidden treasures located in Pickens County and is a free adventure for singles and families alike, much as it was this past weekend with visitors galore.

And more than just the two-legged kind of visitors as well.

Nature also came out to take a peek and begin the seasonal run toward summer as lizards, birds, snakes, turtles, people, and pets soaked up the sun and the refreshing stillness of waterfalls and breezes, along with the earliest of blooms throughout the garden, highlighting various ecosystems and plants from around the world.

With spring just beginning to unfold, the garden is coming to life in shifts as the early bloomers have begun to share their resplendent colors with the rest of the world. As the weeks pass, various plants will continue to do so in shifts as their prime seasons come closer.

As the plants, trees, and flowers unfurl their foliage one group at a time, the garden will burst to life in no time, and catching each as it progresses begins now.

According to its website, the South Carolina Botanical Garden is home to an official American Hosta Society Display Garden, a 70-acre arboretum, miles of nature trails and streams, a butterfly garden, wildflower meadow and many specialty gardens.

The Garden is also home to more than 300 varieties of camellias, as well as an extensive collection of hollies, hydrangeas, magnolias and native plants.

As with most things, the early bird gets the worm, and seeing the progression of the garden firsthand is an experience no money can buy.

As a matter of fact, it won’t. This is a seasonal experience all can enjoy for the cost of the drive as there is no admission charge. It opens at dawn and closes at dusk.

The Botanical Garden is located on 295 acres at 150 Discovery Lane in Clemson. Call 864-656-3405 for more information or visit www.clemson.edu/public/scbg/ for more information.

There are plenty of bridges and water holes for the perfect photo op or a moment of contemplation in the quiet solitude.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0759.jpgThere are plenty of bridges and water holes for the perfect photo op or a moment of contemplation in the quiet solitude. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

“Cracker crumbs” hosta is now in bloom, just one of the many varieties of hosta which may be found within the SC Botanical Garden.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0768.jpg“Cracker crumbs” hosta is now in bloom, just one of the many varieties of hosta which may be found within the SC Botanical Garden. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Waterfalls are seemingly everywhere, providing soothing background music to a leisurely stroll.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0770.jpgWaterfalls are seemingly everywhere, providing soothing background music to a leisurely stroll. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

One good thing about a visit to the SC Botanical Garden is the opportunity to not be in a hurry. With plenty of vistas and seating, visitors may take their time and enjoy all the garden’s sights and sounds.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0776.jpgOne good thing about a visit to the SC Botanical Garden is the opportunity to not be in a hurry. With plenty of vistas and seating, visitors may take their time and enjoy all the garden’s sights and sounds. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Japanese Camellias are some of the early bloomers and provide a variety of colors for the appreciative onlooker.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0779.jpgJapanese Camellias are some of the early bloomers and provide a variety of colors for the appreciative onlooker. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Structures such as this well house provide unexpected discoveries during a weekend walking adventure.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0783.jpgStructures such as this well house provide unexpected discoveries during a weekend walking adventure. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

The sunshine was pouring down and even this common watersnake was quick to enjoy a little sunbathing while others enjoyed the garden itself.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0808.jpgThe sunshine was pouring down and even this common watersnake was quick to enjoy a little sunbathing while others enjoyed the garden itself. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

There are birds, and bird watching stations for the enthusiast, all throughout the garden and it is a rare day when they cannot be seen or heard throughout. Here a crow stops in for a drink of cool water before moving on.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0816.jpgThere are birds, and bird watching stations for the enthusiast, all throughout the garden and it is a rare day when they cannot be seen or heard throughout. Here a crow stops in for a drink of cool water before moving on. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

These waterfalls are part of the Hunt House exhibit, a cabin which has been restored to its original condition circa 1826.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0827.jpgThese waterfalls are part of the Hunt House exhibit, a cabin which has been restored to its original condition circa 1826. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Statuary is strategically placed throughout the garden as a highlight to the natural flora. This piece is entitled “Taming the Wild Wunkus” and is placed prominently within the butterfly garden.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0843.jpgStatuary is strategically placed throughout the garden as a highlight to the natural flora. This piece is entitled “Taming the Wild Wunkus” and is placed prominently within the butterfly garden. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Geese, ducks, and turtles were not to be left out as they surfaced and landed on man made islands within one of the garden’s ponds to enjoy a beautiful day.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_IMG_0855.jpgGeese, ducks, and turtles were not to be left out as they surfaced and landed on man made islands within one of the garden’s ponds to enjoy a beautiful day. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

By D. C. Moody

dmoody@civitasmedia.com

Reach D. C. Moody at 864-855-0355.

Reach D. C. Moody at 864-855-0355.

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