Historic Hagood Mill continues to draw crowds


By D. C. Moody - dmoody@civitasmedia.com



Hagood Mill’s grindstones from over the decades and centuries, believe it or not.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Debba Smith displayed the techniques for spinning yarn, and not just the tall tale, although she had one or two to share. Here Smith is seen spinning cat hair into usable yarn. It seems the 18th and 19th century was tough and nothing went to waste.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

The art of caning chairs is not a dying one but certainly only enjoyed by a few who know the secrets and processes. This piece was constructed April 16.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Jeannette Moody shows her skills as she describes the process of creating a quilt from mere fabric. Moody even described the gossiping which must have gone on during the quilting bees of the 19th century.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

The water wheel that drives the gears and grinds the corn can be seen in this photo, which showcases that it does not take a flood to create the kinetic energy needed to run the grindstone.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Hagood Mill’s actual water wheel driven mill is still in operation, and still utilizes the copper scale funnels in use for far too many years to count.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Grindstones from across the years now double as benches for visitors. These visitors are taking in a little bluegrass music this past weekend.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Every corner at Hagood Mill held a lesson April 16, like this hand pump that gives visitors an idea what life was like in the 19th century. But if you were going to work it, you better know how to prime it.


D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

PICKENS — Sunshine, music and a glimpse into a past belonging to Pickens County most rarely consider were the agenda for the day at Hagood Mill in Pickens as guests took a walk into the past April 16 as part of the Pickens Azalea Festival.

Hagood Mill, still a working mill producing meal, grits and flour, is from a time long gone by in Pickens County, but as visitors strolled through the grounds they were treated to a glimpse of a simpler time when homes produced all the goods they would need.

Items ranging from hand-spun yarn, quilts, ground meal and hand-caned chairs to items produced at a forge by blacksmiths were all on display as were the hands and minds to pass the tradition and techniques along, even if in an introductory fashion.

Plus, the Southern tradition of a moonshine still was on display, just behind bars in case anyone had bright ideas or entrepreneurial spirit.

There were food vendors and musicians also on hand. Some residents chose to pull up a seat, or grindstone as the case may be, enjoy a bite and listen to tunes from the past, classic country, bluegrass, and ditties from a long ago day.

Some chose to visit the Petroglyph museum, featuring prehistoric Native American art. The art is in the form of rocks that have been carved to create images far pre-dating the settlement of the original 13 colonies. Much of the mystery surrounding these ancient carvings is their meaning and exact origin.

Adults, children, toddlers, infants and pets alike found the gathering more than enjoyable with the slow pace and the opportunity to experience a way of life.

Hagood Mill’s grindstones from over the decades and centuries, believe it or not.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0003-2-.jpgHagood Mill’s grindstones from over the decades and centuries, believe it or not. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Debba Smith displayed the techniques for spinning yarn, and not just the tall tale, although she had one or two to share. Here Smith is seen spinning cat hair into usable yarn. It seems the 18th and 19th century was tough and nothing went to waste.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0017-2-.jpgDebba Smith displayed the techniques for spinning yarn, and not just the tall tale, although she had one or two to share. Here Smith is seen spinning cat hair into usable yarn. It seems the 18th and 19th century was tough and nothing went to waste. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

The art of caning chairs is not a dying one but certainly only enjoyed by a few who know the secrets and processes. This piece was constructed April 16.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0032-2-.jpgThe art of caning chairs is not a dying one but certainly only enjoyed by a few who know the secrets and processes. This piece was constructed April 16. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Jeannette Moody shows her skills as she describes the process of creating a quilt from mere fabric. Moody even described the gossiping which must have gone on during the quilting bees of the 19th century.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0044-1-.jpgJeannette Moody shows her skills as she describes the process of creating a quilt from mere fabric. Moody even described the gossiping which must have gone on during the quilting bees of the 19th century. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

The water wheel that drives the gears and grinds the corn can be seen in this photo, which showcases that it does not take a flood to create the kinetic energy needed to run the grindstone.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0052-1-.jpgThe water wheel that drives the gears and grinds the corn can be seen in this photo, which showcases that it does not take a flood to create the kinetic energy needed to run the grindstone. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Hagood Mill’s actual water wheel driven mill is still in operation, and still utilizes the copper scale funnels in use for far too many years to count.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0085-1-.jpgHagood Mill’s actual water wheel driven mill is still in operation, and still utilizes the copper scale funnels in use for far too many years to count. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Grindstones from across the years now double as benches for visitors. These visitors are taking in a little bluegrass music this past weekend.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0087-1-.jpgGrindstones from across the years now double as benches for visitors. These visitors are taking in a little bluegrass music this past weekend. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

Every corner at Hagood Mill held a lesson April 16, like this hand pump that gives visitors an idea what life was like in the 19th century. But if you were going to work it, you better know how to prime it.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_DSC_0097-1-.jpgEvery corner at Hagood Mill held a lesson April 16, like this hand pump that gives visitors an idea what life was like in the 19th century. But if you were going to work it, you better know how to prime it. D. C. Moody | The Pickens Sentinel

By D. C. Moody

dmoody@civitasmedia.com

Reach D. C. Moody at 864-855-0355.

Reach D. C. Moody at 864-855-0355.

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