Summer 2015 high school graduates through the Connect to College program at Tri-County Technical College were, standing from left to right, Victoria Ashley Southerland from Crescent High School; Katelyn P. Crocker Rodriguez from Westside High School; Kelly M. Looper from Easley High School; Ellen B. Epps from T.L. Hanna High School; and Joshua N. Tegen from Pendleton High School. Kneeling is Justin R. Wallace from Powdersville High School; Zori A.Winn from Westside High School; and Reese H. Miller from Easley High School. The Connect to College program has evolved to meet the diverse needs of area students by offering academically capable youth between the ages of 17 and 20 the opportunity to simultaneously earn their high school diploma and college credit, up to and including a postsecondary credential. The first of its kind in South Carolina, C2C is a program for students who, for a variety of reasons, have faced difficult challenges in traditional high school environments.


Courtesy photo

Summer 2015 high school graduates through the Connect to College program at Tri-County Technical College were, standing from left to right, Victoria Ashley Southerland from Crescent High School; Katelyn P. Crocker Rodriguez from Westside High School; Kelly M. Looper from Easley High School; Ellen B. Epps from T.L. Hanna High School; and Joshua N. Tegen from Pendleton High School. Kneeling is Justin R. Wallace from Powdersville High School; Zori A.Winn from Westside High School; and Reese H. Miller from Easley High School. The Connect to College program has evolved to meet the diverse needs of area students by offering academically capable youth between the ages of 17 and 20 the opportunity to simultaneously earn their high school diploma and college credit, up to and including a postsecondary credential. The first of its kind in South Carolina, C2C is a program for students who, for a variety of reasons, have faced difficult challenges in traditional high school environments.

Summer 2015 high school graduates through the Connect to College program at Tri-County Technical College were, standing from left to right, Victoria Ashley Southerland from Crescent High School; Katelyn P. Crocker Rodriguez from Westside High School; Kelly M. Looper from Easley High School; Ellen B. Epps from T.L. Hanna High School; and Joshua N. Tegen from Pendleton High School. Kneeling is Justin R. Wallace from Powdersville High School; Zori A.Winn from Westside High School; and Reese H. Miller from Easley High School. The Connect to College program has evolved to meet the diverse needs of area students by offering academically capable youth between the ages of 17 and 20 the opportunity to simultaneously earn their high school diploma and college credit, up to and including a postsecondary credential. The first of its kind in South Carolina, C2C is a program for students who, for a variety of reasons, have faced difficult challenges in traditional high school environments.
http://pickenssentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_tctcc2careagrads.jpgSummer 2015 high school graduates through the Connect to College program at Tri-County Technical College were, standing from left to right, Victoria Ashley Southerland from Crescent High School; Katelyn P. Crocker Rodriguez from Westside High School; Kelly M. Looper from Easley High School; Ellen B. Epps from T.L. Hanna High School; and Joshua N. Tegen from Pendleton High School. Kneeling is Justin R. Wallace from Powdersville High School; Zori A.Winn from Westside High School; and Reese H. Miller from Easley High School. The Connect to College program has evolved to meet the diverse needs of area students by offering academically capable youth between the ages of 17 and 20 the opportunity to simultaneously earn their high school diploma and college credit, up to and including a postsecondary credential. The first of its kind in South Carolina, C2C is a program for students who, for a variety of reasons, have faced difficult challenges in traditional high school environments. Courtesy photo
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